Baltimore Events

Willie Nelson, Jackson Browne & Father John Misty

Saturday

Jul 15, 2017 – 6:00 PM

10475 Little Patuxent Parkway
Columbia, MD 21044 Map

  • Willie Nelson
  • Jackson Browne
  • Father John Misty

More Info

$55.00 - $125.00
Willie Nelson: Country music legend Willie Nelson has set the bar pretty high for contemporary musicians, having written some of country's most popular songs and even helping to pioneer outlaw country. He is well known for creating Farm Aid, and perhaps even more well known for the tour dates that fund the operation. Nelson's albums have become some of the best selling for any country music artist, releasing 67 studio albums and 27 collaborations with some of country's biggest stars.

Willie Nelson began playing the guitar from a young age, participating in bands and singing in the church choir. He moved to Washington in 1956 to begin a professional career in music, but became more successful writing songs for others while he struggled to play small tour dates. He retired to Austin, TX in 1971, but found that the city's liberal music scene inspired him to create his own brand of country music. He became Atlantic Records' first country artist and debuted his more laid back, rock-inspired sound (later becoming a part of outlaw country) on his 1974 album, Phases and Stages. Nelson continued to display this sound on 1975's Red Headed Stranger, on collaborative albums with artists like Jessi Colter, Merle Haggard, and Waylon Jennings, and on tour dates that were becoming a huge draw.

The 1978 album, Stardust, showed that Nelson could achieve the opposite of his earlier career by turning country standards into his own hit songs. In 1985, Willie Nelson joined Waylon Jennings, Kris Kristofferson, and Johnny Cash in forming The Highwaymen. The country supergroup released three hit albums over the next ten years and played sold-out tour dates to overly enthusiastic fans. Willie Nelson spent most of the 90s playing tour dates until the release of the smash-hit Teatro in 1998, which featured back-up vocals by Emmylou Harris. Willie Nelson was joined by even more mainstream artists on the 2002 album, The Great Divide, which featured Rob Thomas, Kid Rock, Sheryl Crow, and Alison Krauss. Additionally, in 2003, he appeared on country megastar Toby Keith's chart topping song, "Beer for My Horses".

Ever the philanthropist, Nelson headlined the 2005 Tsunami Relief Austin to support victims of the the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake. 2007 saw a collaboration album between Nelson, Merle Haggard, and Ray Price titled Last of the Breed, which was followed a year later by Nelson's solo album, Moment of Forever. Both albums broke into the top ten of Billboard's Top Country Albums.

In 2012, Nelson signed with Legacy Recordings to release both future and curated past recordings. He began his tenure with 2012's Heroes, which featured mostly standards and guest appearances by Snoop Dogg, Sheryl Crow, Kris Kristofferson, and more. However, it also featured new songs that Nelson wrote with his sons Lukas and Micah. A year later, Nelson followed-up with To All The Girls..., which featured his collection of duets with female artists like Dolly Parton, Carrie Underwood, Emmylou Harris, among others. The latter album became his 46th album to break into the top ten of Billboard's Top Country albums, as well as his second album to be featured in the top ten of the Billboard 200.

Nelson continued to shine in his career resurgence, with his 2014 album Spirit topping country charts; the first time the musician had done so since 1986.

Jackson Browne: In many ways, Jackson Browne was the quintessential sensitive Californian singer/songwriter of the early '70s. Only Joni Mitchell and James Taylor ranked alongside him in terms of influence, but neither artist tapped into the post-'60s zeitgeist like Browne. While the majority of his classic '70s work was unflinchingly personal, it nevertheless provided a touchstone for a generation of maturing baby boomers coming to terms with adulthood. Not only did his introspective, literate lyrics strike a nerve, but his laid-back folk-rock set the template for much of the music to come out of California during the '70s. With his first four albums, Browne built a loyal following that helped him break into the mainstream with 1976's The Pretender. During the late '70s and early '80s, he was at the height of his popularity, as each of his albums charted in the Top Ten. Midway through the '80s, Browne made a series of political protest records that caused his audience to gradually shrink, but when he returned to introspective songwriting with 1993's I'm Alive, he made a modest comeback.

Born in Heidelberg, West Germany, Jackson Browne and his family moved to Los Angeles when he was three years old, and by the time he was a teenager, Browne had developed an interest in folk music. He began playing guitar and writing songs, which he sang at local folk clubs. Early in 1966, he was invited to join the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, whom he had met through the L.A. folk circuit. While he was only with the band for a few months, the group recorded a handful of his songs on its first two records. By the beginning of 1967, he had signed a publishing deal with Nina Music, a division of Elektra Records; Nina helped Browne secure songs on albums by Tom Rush and Steve Noonan in 1968. During 1967 and 1968, he lived in New York's Greenwich Village, where he played in Tim Buckley's backing band. Browne also began working with Nico, who recorded three of his songs on her Chelsea Girl album. When their relationship disintegrated in 1968, he returned to Los Angeles, where he unsuccessfully tried to record a solo album and form a folk group with Ned Doheney and Jack Wilce. Browne continued to play local clubs and his reputation as a songwriter continued to grow, with Linda Ronstadt and the Byrds recording his songs. By the end of 1971, he had signed with David Geffen's fledgling Asylum Records on the strength of his widely circulated demo tape.

Jackson Browne was released in the spring of 1972, spawning the Top Ten hit single "Doctor My Eyes." Shortly after "Doctor My Eyes" reached its peak position, "Take It Easy," a song Browne co-wrote with Glenn Frey, became the Eagles' breakthrough hit. Many songs from his debut, including "Rock Me on the Water" and "Jamaica Say You Will," became singer/songwriter standards, but the album itself didn't establish Browne as a pop star, despite its hit single. On his second album, 1973's For Everyman, he began a long-term collaboration with instrumentalist David Lindley. For Everyman was a commercial disappointment, yet it consolidated his cult following.

Released in the fall of 1974, Late for the Sky expanded Browne's audience significantly, peaking at number 14 on the charts and going gold by the beginning of the following year. Browne's first wife, Phyllis, committed suicide in the spring of 1976, but in the wake of the tragedy he recorded his commercial breakthrough album, The Pretender. The record climbed into the Top Ten upon its fall 1976 release, going platinum in the spring of 1977. In the summer, Browne launched an extensive tour, recording a new album while he was on the road. The resulting record, Running On Empty (1977), was a bigger success than its predecessor, peaking at number three and launching the hit singles "Running On Empty" and "Stay/The Load-Out." With his career riding high, Browne began to pursue political and social causes, most notably protesting the use of nuclear energy.

The success of Hold Out, the 1980 follow-up to Running On Empty, was evidence of Jackson Browne's popularity. Though the album wasn't as well crafted as its predecessors, it became his only number one album upon its summer release. In the summer of 1982, "Somebody's Baby," from the soundtrack of Fast Times at Ridgemont High, became Browne's biggest hit, climbing to number seven on the U.S. charts. Divided between love songs and political protests, Lawyers in Love was another hit due to success of the hit singles "Lawyers in Love," "Tender Is the Night," and "For a Rocker." Nevertheless, the album also showcased a newly found social consciousness, which dominated 1986's Lives in the Balance. The album lacked any hit singles, yet its fiery condemnation of the Reagan era won an audience -- the album stayed on the charts for over six months and went gold.

Jackson Browne continued to write primarily political songs on 1989's World in Motion, but the record became his first album to not go gold. Browne was quiet for the next four years, working on a variety of social causes and suffering a painful public breakup with his girlfriend, actress Daryl Hannah. He finally returned with a comeback effort in the fall of 1993 entitled I'm Alive. Comprised of personal songs, I'm Alive received his best reviews since the late '70s and the record went gold without producing any major hits. In the spring of 1996, Browne released Looking East, which failed to gain the same attention as I'm Alive. In 2002, he released The Naked Ride Home. Two years later the two disc The Very Best of Jackson Browne hit the shelves as Browne was being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by fellow Hall of Famer Bruce Springsteen. Around this time Browne took to the road and played intimate, acoustic shows around the globe. The 2005 release Solo Acoustic, Vol. 1 was compiled from these concerts and appeared on Inside Recordings, an independent label founded by Browne.

Father John Misty: After dropping out of college in New York, Josh Tillman (b. 1981) moved to Seattle and spent a year paying rent by freelance writing and donating plasma. Befriending Eric Fisher (Damien Jurado, Rosie Thomas) while on tour in the fall on 2004, Tillman coerced him into recording what would become ” I Will Return”, a full-length reminiscent of the southern-gothic writings of Flannery O’Conner and the music of Nick Drake and Pete Seeger. The CD-R would be distributed and promoted word-of-mouth in paper sleeves while on the road (with acts such as Damien Jurado, Dolorean and Saxon Shore) for over a year until spring 2005 when KEEP Recordings offered to release a limited, special edition run of the record. Tillman continues to record constantly, finishing a full-length with Fisher entitled ”Long May You Run, J. Tillman”.

Artist is also tagged by download services as J. Tillman, and aside from his role as a prolific singer-songwriter, also plays drums for Seattle WA based band Fleet Foxes. Since 2012, he has taken a drastic departure from his previous musical style. Now touring and releasing music under the moniker Father John Misty, Tillman's creative direction has taken an ethereal and meandering direction that has become a hit with old fans and new.

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